<div dir="ltr">On 27 June 2013 23:39, Mark Hahn <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:hahn@mcmaster.ca" target="_blank">hahn@mcmaster.ca</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
consider this a bit of devils advocacy and/or display of hickishness:<br>
<br>
why the big deal about cf-engine/salt/puppet/chef/etc?<br>
to me, a sensible cluster is nfs-root based, so there is<br>
hardly ever any mass-configuration to do.  when there is,<br>
it&#39;s usually something like &quot;pdsh -a check_something.sh&quot;.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>But how do you describe and track the configuration of the nfs-root? For me the point about the configuration management tools is not that they allow you to configure thousands of nodes through the network, it&#39;s that they give you a language to describe how to configure a system and it&#39;s dependencies at a higher level than the series of commands required to bring the system to the same point.</div>
<div style><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><br>
I can easily imagine large web-based sites that might have<br>
lots of machines in different roles, for which these auto-devops<br>
systems would make a lot of sense.  but even a large HPC cluster<br>
might consist of one admin node, and identical N-1 compute nodes,<br>
and one login node (compute node with a couple tweaks.)<br>
an organization might well have multiple such clusters,<br>
though that begs the question of why they are separate...<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>If you think about services rather than systems, and include all of the supporting systems required for a cluster to operate, the number of different &quot;nodes&quot; increases. I believe current practice in large scale webshops is to dedicate machines to single services, so for them system == service.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>In my experience, if you have multiple clusters then the likelihood that they have homogeneous hardware is zero. Also, they are probably being used by different groups with different requirements.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>Cheers</div><div style><br></div><div style> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
regards, mark hahn.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Beowulf mailing list, <a href="mailto:Beowulf@beowulf.org">Beowulf@beowulf.org</a> sponsored by Penguin Computing<br>
To change your subscription (digest mode or unsubscribe) visit <a href="http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf" target="_blank">http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>Jonathan Barber &lt;<a href="mailto:jonathan.barber@gmail.com">jonathan.barber@gmail.com</a>&gt;
</div></div>