<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
</head>
<body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 14px; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; ">
<div>
<div>
<div><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<span id="OLK_SRC_BODY_SECTION">
<div style="font-family:Calibri; font-size:11pt; text-align:left; color:black; BORDER-BOTTOM: medium none; BORDER-LEFT: medium none; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0in; PADDING-LEFT: 0in; PADDING-RIGHT: 0in; BORDER-TOP: #b5c4df 1pt solid; BORDER-RIGHT: medium none; PADDING-TOP: 3pt">
<span style="font-weight:bold">From: </span>&quot;Peter St. John&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:peter.st.john@gmail.com">peter.st.john@gmail.com</a>&gt;<br>
<span style="font-weight:bold">Date: </span>Monday, April 22, 2013 6:19 PM<br>
<span style="font-weight:bold">To: </span>mathog &lt;<a href="mailto:mathog@caltech.edu">mathog@caltech.edu</a>&gt;<br>
<span style="font-weight:bold">Cc: </span>&quot;<a href="mailto:beowulf@beowulf.org">beowulf@beowulf.org</a>&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:beowulf@beowulf.org">beowulf@beowulf.org</a>&gt;<br>
<span style="font-weight:bold">Subject: </span>Re: [Beowulf] Are disk MTBF ratings at all useful?<br>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>
<div>Human mortality has, broadly, a Poisson, and a non-Poisson, component. The chance of getting hit by a meteor is Poisson, it has nothing to do with your age; but the chance of a 99 year old living to 100 is lower than the chance of a 20 year old living
 to 21, because we wear out, that's not Poisson. (Dogs are a clearer example: the chance of getting hit by a car is Poisson, but dying of old age after a dozen years or so is not.)
<div><br>
</div>
<div>We usually think of incandescent light bulbs as Poisson; the chance of, I don't know, Brownian Motion, clipping a very narrow filament, is bigger than the degradation of mere use; except in the case of switching the bulb off and on frequently, when the
 chance of failure depends more on fatigue as the filament expands and contracts.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Hard Disks are somewhat Poisson, and somewhat not. More so, I think, than humans.</div>
</div>
</div>
</span>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>----</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>What you are describing &nbsp;is the standard bathtub curve, where the failure rate is constant on the &quot;bottom&quot; of the bathtub. &nbsp;Infant mortality isn't an issue any more, and old age/wearout hasn't started.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>I would say that the real question is &quot;where is the far side of the bathtub&quot; where the rate starts climbing steeply. &nbsp;That's the important number, and one that is NOT necessarily the MTBF. &nbsp;I suspect the &quot;calculated&quot; MTBF in a system without any big wearout
 mechanisms would be essentially the inverse of the failure rate in the flat part of the curve. &nbsp;However, electromechanical devices DO have wear-out mechanisms, and they likely have shorter life that the electronics.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Furthermore, the wear life might some complicated thing like &quot;integrated head motion&quot; with some very complicated power laws. As an example of a seemingly simple component with a complex life phenomenon, take capacitors used for pulsed power systems.. &nbsp;They
 typically have a life that goes something like</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Lx = Lref * (Qref/Qx)^1.6 * (Vref/Vx)^7.5</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>The wearout mechanism has to do with internal mechanical stresses. &nbsp; So, increasing the Q of the circuit increases the amount of voltage reversal as the exponentially damped sine wave rings down. &nbsp;And voltage has a very strong effect on life, because it
 is directly related to the mechanical loads, as well as the electrical stress on the dielectric.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Another common device with a not entirely intuitive life characteristic is an incandescent light bulb. &nbsp;Life goes as (variously) the 12th to 16th power of voltage (higher voltage = shorter life), while light output goes as the 3.4 power of voltage. So
 you could have a usage pattern that seems equivalent in terms of operating hours, or total lumen-seconds produced, and have very different life.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>The same is no doubt true of disk drives. &nbsp;While the google folks didn't find any big obvious patterns (other than failure rates increasing at low and high temps), they also commented that their sample was non-homogenous, so you could be looking at the
 equivalent of 100 Volt, 120Volt and 130Volt lightbulbs all running off the same 115V circuit.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<span id="OLK_SRC_BODY_SECTION">
<div>
<div>
<div><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</span>
</body>
</html>