<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra">On Mon, Apr 22, 2013 at 7:21 AM, Joe Landman <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:landman@scalableinformatics.com" target="_blank">landman@scalableinformatics.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On 04/22/2013 07:16 AM, atchley <a href="http://tds.net" target="_blank">tds.net</a> wrote:<br>

&gt; The Intel page linked from above says that it is standards based. I<br>
&gt; assume OpenFlow, but I don&#39;t see it listed anywhere. Ahh, looking at one<br>
&gt; of their white papers, it mentions it could be based on an API like<br>
&gt; OpenFlow.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Intel is moving into switches? Does Intel already make switches?<br>
<br>
</div>Intel owns Fulcrum (ASIC in many 10GbE switches), Aries interconnect,<br>
Infiniband (from QLogic/PathScale).  Switches were, to a degree,<br>
inevitable for them.  A natural progression.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>I had forgotten about Fulcrum. I was under the impression that Fulcrum made the chips and sold them to switch vendors. OpenFlow takes effort from the switch vendor, not necessarily the silicon vendor. If they get in to the business of selling complete switches, then this makes sense.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>Does this does apply to Aries or IB-style switches? Aries, like Gemini, uses hardware routing (butterfly versus 3D torus). What would it mean to have a software defined routing on a hardware routed fabric? The routers would need to be (more) programmable.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>With InfiniBand semantics (lossless and strong ordering), you can&#39;t define multiple paths or reroute so what is the advantage of software defined networking? Possibly in management, but I assumed that vendors already provided tools to manage switches en masse within a single fabric.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>DOE is spending some research money on software defined networks (SDN) using OpenFlow on ESnet. The driver is to provide special capabilities over the wide-area between labs (e.g. multi-pathing for higher throughput) that may not apply within the cluster/HPC system.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>Scott</div></div></div></div>