Human mortality has, broadly, a Poisson, and a non-Poisson, component. The chance of getting hit by a meteor is Poisson, it has nothing to do with your age; but the chance of a 99 year old living to 100 is lower than the chance of a 20 year old living to 21, because we wear out, that&#39;s not Poisson. (Dogs are a clearer example: the chance of getting hit by a car is Poisson, but dying of old age after a dozen years or so is not.)<div>
<br></div><div>We usually think of incandescent light bulbs as Poisson; the chance of, I don&#39;t know, Brownian Motion, clipping a very narrow filament, is bigger than the degradation of mere use; except in the case of switching the bulb off and on frequently, when the chance of failure depends more on fatigue as the filament expands and contracts.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Hard Disks are somewhat Poisson, and somewhat not. More so, I think, than humans.</div><div><br></div><div>Peter<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Apr 22, 2013 at 12:07 PM, mathog <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mathog@caltech.edu" target="_blank">mathog@caltech.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">In partial answer to the subject question, let us apply the mode of<br>
analysis used by the drive manufacturers<br>
to human life expectancy, as if Humans were one of their products.<br>
That is, what is the Human AFR and<br>
MTBF? Unlike for disk drives, we can easily obtain a table of USA<br>
mortality rates, this one<br>
is for the year 2007:<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/MortFinal2007_Worktable23r.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/MortFinal2007_Worktable23r.pdf</a><br>
<br>
Looking at the first row of the table, which is the data for the whole<br>
country, we see that it has a bathtub<br>
shaped curve, with a relatively high &quot;early failure rate&quot;, which<br>
decreases to a minimum for the<br>
ages 5-14, and then an increasing &quot;failure rate&quot; with advancing years.<br>
<br>
Now assume the &quot;manufacturer&quot; calculates the AFR assuming a &quot;working<br>
life&quot; for the &quot;product&quot;<br>
of 20 years.  The total &quot;failures&quot;/100,000 over that period measured in<br>
2007 were:<br>
<br>
685.4 + 4*28.6 + 10*15.3 + 5*79.9 = 1352.3<br>
<br>
Giving a 20 year failure rate of<br>
1352.3 / 100000 = .013523<br>
and an AFR of .013523/20 = .000676,<br>
or .0676%.<br>
<br>
So the MTBF for the humans (in years, not hours), is 1/.000676 = 1479<br>
years.<br>
This number is just as nonsensical for people as 150 years is for<br>
disks.<br>
<br>
In the human case, since we have all the data, we can see exactly why<br>
the result is so far off.<br>
In rough terms the human mortality rate doubles for every decade of<br>
age.  Consequently any AFR<br>
calculated up to an age below the actual MTBF (average lifespan) will<br>
be an underestimate, and<br>
the earlier the cut off, the further off the value will be.   This is<br>
on top of the other issue<br>
which affects the calculations for disks - the definition of a &quot;failed<br>
unit&quot; used by the manufacturers<br>
is much less stringent than that employed by the end users/vendors.<br>
<br>
Regards,<br>
<div class="im HOEnZb"><br>
David Mathog<br>
<a href="mailto:mathog@caltech.edu">mathog@caltech.edu</a><br>
Manager, Sequence Analysis Facility, Biology Division, Caltech<br>
</div><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Beowulf mailing list, <a href="mailto:Beowulf@beowulf.org">Beowulf@beowulf.org</a> sponsored by Penguin Computing<br>
To change your subscription (digest mode or unsubscribe) visit <a href="http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf" target="_blank">http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>