<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><br>From: Adam DeConinck &lt;<a href="mailto:ajdecon@ajdecon.org">ajdecon@ajdecon.org</a>&gt;<br>

Subject: Re: [Beowulf] Definition of HPC<br>
To: <a href="mailto:beowulf@beowulf.org">beowulf@beowulf.org</a> </blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"> </blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
My own (vague) definition of HPC would probably be based more on the<br>
intended design of the system, something like:<br>
<br>
&quot;A high-performance computing system is designed to use one or more<br>
computers to achieve the maximum performance possible on a particular<br>
computational task.&quot;<br>
<br>
This could be improved, but it makes a distinction between maxing out a<br>
&quot;normal&quot; computer and designing a system specifically for performance.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>The definition I use is:</div><div style>A Computational task that requires combining the performance of multiple systems to achieve results faster than a single system.  The key requirement is the aggregation of hardware resources (CPU, Memory, Disk, Networking, etc) beyond a single &quot;box&quot; whether under a single OS instance like ScaleMP/SMP or multiple OS/s using MPI and other methods of managing the distribution of tasks.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>This should be easily distinguishable from Enterprise computing tasks which often can make due with a fraction of a system to complete its designated task, enabling the virtualization technologies to thrive.  Multiple systems are used typically for High Availability rather than High Performance in Enterprise computing.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>The &quot;task&quot; still needs to be defined, perhaps as a &quot;computational task&quot;, to distinguish it from farms of email servers that may well churn at 100% utilization at peak times.  Of course, email looks more and more like a big data / big compute problem every day when hiding spam and virus protection tasks are taken into account.</div>
<div style><br></div><div style> </div></div></div></div>