<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 14 (filtered medium)">
<style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Tahoma;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-reply;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:#1F497D;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]-->
</head>
<body lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple">
<div class="WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">I see the difference as one of &#8220;how it&#8217;s connected&#8221;..<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">If we look back at things like the Floating Point Systems boxes that did fast FFTs hanging off a PDP-11, that&#8217;s a box where you send a bunch of data, kick it
 to go, and wait for the results.&nbsp; I see that as an accelerator.&nbsp; (and perhaps a modern GPU fits in that model).<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><br>
I see a coprocessor as being more tightly coupled.&nbsp; Take as an example the Floating Point Unit.&nbsp; Often integrated on chip, in the past it was an optional widget that worked sort of in parallel with the main CPU.&nbsp; That is, you&#8217;d have instructions like &#8220;FMUL&#8221;..
 if you had the FPU hooked up, the main CPU stopped, the FPU did the calculation, and the main CPU resumed.&nbsp; If you didn&#8217;t have the FPU hooked up, you got an instruction trap, and some software Floating point routine emulated the effect of the FPU.<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">That is, the coprocessor is &#8220;synchronous&#8221; with the main CPU in some way.&nbsp; (even if you can parallelize the pipelines, for instance).&nbsp; Often, for instance, the
 FPU can &#8220;see&#8221; the registers of the main processor, even if it implements separate floating point registers. Likewise,the main CPU can &#8220;see&#8221; the FPU registers&nbsp; (and woe to the person who forgets to store and restore those FP registers in an ISR that changes
 the state of those registers)<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">Jim Lux<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Tahoma&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;">From:</span></b><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Tahoma&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;"> beowulf-bounces@beowulf.org [mailto:beowulf-bounces@beowulf.org]
<b>On Behalf Of </b>amjad ali<br>
<b>Sent:</b> Sunday, March 10, 2013 9:36 AM<br>
<b>To:</b> Beowulf Mailing List<br>
<b>Subject:</b> [Beowulf] difference between accelerators and co-processors<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Hello All,<o:p></o:p></p>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">Is there any line/point to make distinction between accelerators and co-processors (that are used in conjunction with the primary CPU to boost up the performance)? or these terms can be used&nbsp;interchangeably?<o:p></o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">Specifically, the word &quot;accelerator&quot; is used commonly with GPU. On the other hand &nbsp;the word &quot;co-processors&quot; is used commonly with Xeon Phi.<o:p></o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">Thank you.<o:p></o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">Regards,<o:p></o:p></p>
</div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">Amjad<o:p></o:p></p>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>