<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 14 (filtered medium)">
<style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Consolas;
        panose-1:2 11 6 9 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:11.0pt;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        mso-style-link:"Plain Text Char";
        margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:11.0pt;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-compose;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:windowtext;}
span.PlainTextChar
        {mso-style-name:"Plain Text Char";
        mso-style-priority:99;
        mso-style-link:"Plain Text";
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]-->
</head>
<body lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple">
<div class="WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal">Earlier I wrote:<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">Or, this is probably a manifestation of the people who have the domain expertise not coming from a background that is software rich.<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">If you looked at, say, numerical codes for finite element analysis, the people doing that have been using computers for decades, so there's a goodly number of people who have gone through the learning curve of &quot;roll your own&quot; vs &quot;use
 the library&quot;.. Or, even if they're not actually doing it, they're working with other people who are doing it, so they pick up &quot;good design&quot; by osmosis if nothing else.<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">The other thing is that a lot of codes (I don't know about the biology space, but certainly in engineering) are rarely from scratch.&nbsp; It starts as someone else's code that you modify, and then someone else modifies, etc.&nbsp; Over time,
 I think that process also leads to better design: the nasty ones tend to die out, the good ones persist and are reused.<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">&#8230;<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">I also occurs to me that there&#8217;s another factor here.. I learned to code in the late 60s and early 70s, when FORTRAN was king, and IBM&#8217;s Scientific Subroutine Package (e.g.
<a href="http://media.ibm1130.org/1130-106-ocr.pdf">http://media.ibm1130.org/1130-106-ocr.pdf</a>) &nbsp;was an essential part of doing things (who wants to code up a version for SIN() every time).&nbsp; As I understand it, This was something that IBM basically almost
 gave away (did it originate within SHARE?).&nbsp; So you were in the habit of using libraries to do things you needed.&nbsp; Likewise, I&#8217;ll bet a lot of people used the source code published in the IEEE journals for FFTs&nbsp; (I know I sure did.. that early simple non-optimized
 radix-2 FORTRAN code that&#8217;s about 20-30 lines long, for one thing).&nbsp; And you may have done this out of sheer laziness by borrowing the deck from a colleague or friend (who wants to punch all those cards).&nbsp; Burroughs had a similar thing for their mainframe
 machines. And there was tons of stuff available from DECUS. In fact, those documents and code were a fairly decent education in numerical algorithms (and of course, grist for subsequent discussions of poor algorithms.. random number generation is notorious)<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">In an academic environment in the 70s, there wasn&#8217;t any particular reason NOT to share your code. If you were working under a government grant or funding, it was basically public domain anyway.<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">For big FEM codes (NASTRAN for mechanical stuff, NEC for electromagnetics) the source codes were published, with documentation on how they worked, and a lively commentary on the quality of implementation.
<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">So there&#8217;s an enormous number of fairly well written examples (for the time) out there to look at and use and modify, so the culture evolved that way.<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText">In the biology area though, computers are a latecomer. &nbsp;There&#8217;s also a recognition that those codes might be &#8220;valuable intellectual property&#8221; no matter how poorly coded and designed they are.&nbsp; A well-engineered and efficient code would
 be especially valuable, and provide a competitive advantage. &nbsp;AND, because of the Bayh-Dole act, even government funded development within the academic environment (traditionally open and sharing) &nbsp;can be proprietary.<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoPlainText"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:#1F497D">James Lux, P.E.<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:#1F497D">Task Manager, FINDER &#8211; Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:#1F497D">Co-Principal Investigator, SCaN Testbed (</span><i>née</i><span style="color:#1F497D"> CoNNeCT) Project<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:#1F497D">Jet Propulsion Laboratory<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:#1F497D">4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 161-213<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:#1F497D">Pasadena CA 91109<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:#1F497D">&#43;(818)354-2075<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p>
</div>
</body>
</html>