<br>&gt; On Tue, 4 Sep 2012, Ellis H. Wilson III wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">Which is why I was suggesting that, &quot;Maybe the whole thing is just</div>

built, sealed for good, primed with [hydrogen/oil/he/whatever], started,<br>
<div class="im">allowed to slowly degrade over time and finally tossed when the still<br>
</div>working equipment is sufficiently dated.&quot;  </blockquote><div><br></div><div>I remember an &quot;ancient&quot; IBM technical article about the BlueGene, here: <a href="http://researcher.watson.ibm.com/researcher/files/us-ajayr/SysJ_BlueGene.pdf">http://researcher.watson.ibm.com/researcher/files/us-ajayr/SysJ_BlueGene.pdf</a></div>
<div><br></div><div>In the work (or maybe it was a closely related paper), the authors make the point that as core count increases and feature size decreases, cpu units will have to be fault tolerant, eg if cosmic rays have toasted 10% of your chip&#39;s cores, it should still be able to function.  Related, this is one of the great beauties of FPGA&#39;s.  Jim Lux can probably tell us if this would be real, but it would seem to make sense to program a space probe (ie voyager type) with an FPGA emulated CPU for the sake of damage survivability.  In the worst case that the probe encounters something unpleasant and part of the FPGA is damaged, perhaps the rest of the LUT&#39;s in the FPGA could be reprogrammed to produce a less powerful, yet still functional, controller.  This would take the &quot;field programmable&quot; aspect to the device to a new height...</div>
<div><br></div><div>Nathan</div></div>