<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Feb 5, 2009 at 3:33 PM, Nifty Tom Mitchell <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:niftyompi@niftyegg.com">niftyompi@niftyegg.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">On Thu, Feb 05, 2009 at 02:58:06PM -0500, Robert G. Brown wrote:<br>
> On Thu, 5 Feb 2009, Gus Correa wrote:<br>
><br>
>> Dear Beowulfers<br>
>><br>
>> A mundane question:<br>
>><br>
>> What is the right lubricant for computer rack sliding rails?<br>
>> Silicone, paraffin, graphite, WD-40, machine oil, grease, other?<br>
><br>
> If you immerse your nodes in olive oil, it shouldn't be an issue, right?<br>
> ;-)<br>
><br>
> Otherwise, graphite is the only one I'd reject a priori, as it's a fine<br>
> conducting powder.  Personally I'd use WD, but hell, I'd cook with WD if<br>
> I couldn't find any olive oil...<br>
><br>
> (The main issue in any case is to be sparing and not spray it so it gets<br>
> sucked into cooling fans.)<br>
><br>
<br>
</div>Baring feedback from the vendor...<br>
<br>
Also shy away from WD-40 as a general lubricant.  It gets gummy over<br>
time.  For slides look at a light grease, perhaps a white lithium<br>
grease like 3Mô White Grease commonly used on some garage doors and<br>
autos.  It only takes a little....<br>
<br>
There are also Teflon based white greases and many excellent but black<br>
and dirty molybdenum disulphide greases.  Moly rich grease is interesting<br>
in that the moly "plates" on the surface and if the tolerances are tight<br>
binding (not lubrication) can occur.  On old cars however it can tighten<br>
up things if used sparingly.  As much as I like moly greases I think<br>
a multi-purpose lithium based white grease from an auto supply house is<br>
the best choice in this case.<br>
<br>
It only takes a little....<br></blockquote></div><br>Teflon grease can be purchased from Bicycle shops. It's apparently more
durable than lithium grease over a reasonable temperature range -- less
prone to go runny.<br clear="all"><br>-- <br>MORE CORE AVAILABLE, BUT NOT FOR YOU<br>